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 Post subject: Aortic aneurysm
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 9:30 pm 
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Location: Kuala Lumpur


An aortic aneurysm is the dilatation (widening or bulge) of a portion of the aorta, usually at a weak spot in the aortic wall. The aorta is the largest artery in the body. It carries all the blood that is pumped out of the heart and distributes it, via its many branches, to all the organs of the body. The aorta projects upwards from the heart in the chest and then arches downwards, traveling through the chest (the thoracic aorta) and into the abdomen (the abdominal aorta). The normal diameter of the abdominal aorta is about one inch.

An aneurysm is a bulge in the wall of an artery. It usually occurs when an artery wall becomes weak or damaged by the accumulation of fatty deposits (atherosclerosis). Atherosclerosis is sometimes referred to as hardening of the arteries.

atherosclerosis
back pain
Aneurysms can form in any artery, anywhere in your body, including an artery in your brain (brain aneurysm). However, most aneurysms occur in the aorta - the body's largest artery. The aorta, which resembles a garden hose in thickness, runs from your heart down the center of your chest and abdomen, eventually splitting off into two arteries, one that serves each leg.

Although an aneurysm can develop anywhere along your aorta, most occur in the section running through your abdomen (abdominal aneurysms). The rest occur in the section that runs through your upper chest (thoracic aneurysms).

Signs and symptoms

Fortunately, not all aortic aneurysms reach the point of rupture. Many start small and stay small. Others slowly expand over time like a balloon that's slowly being over inflated, increasing little by little each year โ€” typically 1/8 to 1/4 inch (about 3 to 6 millimeters). Some expand at faster rates.

Often, aortic aneurysms enlarge slowly and without symptoms, making them difficult to detect. However, as an aortic aneurysm enlarges, some people may notice a pulsating bulge in their abdomen or may feel back pain.

Aortic aneurysms can house small blood clots. If a blood clot breaks loose from the inside wall of an aneurysm and travels into your leg or foot, it can block blood flow and cause sudden pain.

more info at:
http://www.dreddyclinic.com/findinformation/aa/aorticaneurysm.htm


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 Post subject: Aortic Aneurysms
PostPosted: Sat Apr 07, 2007 10:22 pm 
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Location: Kuala Lumpur
An aortic aneurysm is a weakened and bulging area in the aorta, the major blood vessel that feeds blood to the body. The aorta, about the thickness of a garden hose, runs through the center of your body. Because the aorta is the body's predominant supplier of blood, a ruptured aortic aneurysm can cause life-threatening bleeding. Although you may never have symptoms, finding out you have an aortic aneurysm can be more than unsettling. Each year, approximately 15,000 people die of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in the United States.

Most aneurysms are small and slow growing and rarely rupture. Less commonly, aneurysms are larger and faster growing and are at higher risk of rupturing. Depending on the size and rate at which it is growing, treatment for aortic aneurysm may vary from watchful waiting to emergency surgery. Once an aortic aneurysm is identified, doctors will closely monitor it so that surgery can be planned if and when necessary. Emergency surgery for a ruptured aneurysm carries increased risk and less chance of survival.

more info at:
http://www.dreddyclinic.com/findinformation/aa/aorticaneurysm.htm


Last edited by Health Dr-1 on Fri Apr 27, 2007 11:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 07, 2007 10:24 pm 
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Aneurysms can develop anywhere along the aorta, but mostly occur in the abdominal section and are aptly called abdominal aortic aneurysms. Aneurysms that occur in the upper part of the aorta are called thoracic aortic aneurysms.

Aortic aneurysms often grow slowly and usually without symptoms, making them difficult to detect. Not all aortic aneurysms reach the point of rupture. Many start small and stay small, although many expand over time. Some aortic aneurysms enlarge slowly, increasing less than half an inch (1.2 centimeters) a year. Others expand at faster rates, which increases the risk of rupture. The rate at which aortic aneurysms may expand is difficult to predict.

As an aortic aneurysm enlarges, some people may notice:

A pulsating sensation near the navel
Tenderness or pain in the abdomen or chest
Back pain

more info at:
http://www.dreddyclinic.com/findinformation/aa/aorticaneurysm.htm


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