logo www.dreddyclinic.com

Home | Up | Introduction | What's Included | Products | Adding Pages | FAQs | Ayurvedic Medicine | Integrated Medicine | Education | Contents | Articles | Links | Products | Search | Feedback | Contact
Ayurvedic - Integrated Medical Clinic - reliable health information ...Balance your health
Raynaud
Home
Up
Introduction
What's Included
Products
Adding Pages
FAQs
Ayurvedic Medicine
Integrated Medicine
Education
Contents
Articles
Links
Products
Search
Feedback
Contact
Special Programs
Study Programs
Colon Cleansing
Colon Cleansing Program

One of the most frequent bowel problems that people experience today is constipation. Why is the Colon Cleansing so important? Check it out.

Newsroom
 

Downloads

Pricelist for the treatments

application form for the Ayurvedic courses

adobe pdf logoYou will need the free Acrobat Reader from Adobe to view and print some of the documents. 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

Google
 
Web dreddyclinic.com

Raynaud's disease

Diseases & Conditions A-Z

| A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U |

 V | W | X | Y | Z |

HEART & BLOOD

Cardiovascular System

Raynaud's is a condition that causes some areas of your body - such as your fingers, toes, tip of your nose and your ears - to feel numb and cool in response to cold temperatures or stress. It's a disorder of the blood vessels that supply blood to your skin. During a Raynaud's attack, these arteries narrow, limiting blood circulation to affected areas.

You can have Raynaud's without any underlying disease associated with it, in which case it's called Raynaud's disease or primary Raynaud's. Or it can be part of another disease, in which case doctors may refer to it as Raynaud's phenomenon or secondary Raynaud's.

Women are more likely than men are to have the disorder. It's more common in people who live in colder climates.

Treatment of Raynaud's depends on its severity and the presence or absence of associated conditions. For most people, Raynaud's is more a nuisance than a disability.

Signs and symptoms

Raynaud's is more than simply having cold hands and cold feet, and it's not the same as frostbite. Signs and symptoms of Raynaud's depend on the frequency, duration and severity of the blood vessel spasms that underlie the disorder. Signs and symptoms include:

  • Sequence of color changes in your skin in response to cold or stress

  • Numb, prickly feeling or stinging pain upon warming or relief of stress

At first during an attack of Raynaud's, affected areas of your skin usually turn white. Then, the areas often turn blue and feel cold and numb, and your sensory perception is dull. The affected skin may look slightly swollen. As circulation improves, the affected areas may turn red, throb, tingle or swell. The order of the changes of color isn't the same for all people, and not everyone experiences all three colors.

Occasionally, an attack affects just one or two fingers or toes. Attacks don't necessarily always affect the same digits. Although Raynaud's most commonly affects your fingers and toes, the condition also can affect other areas of your body such as your nose, cheeks, ears and even tongue. An attack may last less than a minute to several hours. Over time, attacks may grow more severe.

People who have Raynaud's accompanied by another disease also may have symptoms related to their underlying condition.

Causes

Doctors don't completely understand the cause of Raynaud's attacks, but blood vessels in the hands and feet appear to overreact to cold temperatures or stress.

When your body is exposed to cold temperatures, your extremities lose heat. Your body slows down blood supply to your fingers and toes to preserve your body's core temperature. Your body specifically reduces blood flow by narrowing the small arteries under the skin of your extremities. In people with Raynaud's, this normal response is exaggerated. Stress causes a similar reaction to cold in the body, and likewise the body's response may be exaggerated.

With Raynaud's, arteries to your fingers and toes go into what's called vasospasm. This constricts the vessels, temporarily but dramatically limiting blood supply. Over time, these same small arteries may also thicken slightly, further limiting blood flow. The result is that affected skin turns a pale and dusky color due to the lack of blood flow to the area. Once the spasms subside and blood returns to the area, the tissue may turn red before returning to a normal color.

Cold temperatures are most likely to provoke an attack. Exposure to cold can be as simple as putting your hands under a faucet of running cold water, taking something out of the freezer or exposure to cold air. For some people, exposure to cold temperatures isn't necessary. Emotional stress alone can cause an episode of Raynaud's.

Some researchers are studying whether Raynaud's may be partly an inherited disorder.

Primary vs. secondary Raynaud's
Raynaud's occurs in two main types:

  • Primary Raynaud's. This is Raynaud's without an underlying disease or associated medical problem that could provoke vasospasm. Also called Raynaud's disease, it's the most common form of the disorder. Primary Raynaud's typically affects both hands and both feet.

  • Secondary Raynaud's. This is Raynaud's caused by an underlying problem. Also called Raynaud's phenomenon, secondary Raynaud's usually affects both of your hands or both feet. Although secondary Raynaud's is less common than the primary form, it's often a more complex and serious disorder.

Causes of secondary Raynaud's include:

  • Scleroderma. Raynaud's phenomenon occurs in about 90 percent of people who have scleroderma — a rare disease that leads to hardening and scarring of the skin. Scleroderma, a type of connective tissue disease, results in Raynaud's because the disease reduces blood flow to the extremities. It causes tiny blood vessels in the hands and feet to thicken and to constrict too easily, promoting Raynaud's.

  • Lupus. About one-third of Americans with lupus — an autoimmune disease that can affect many parts of your body, including your skin, joints, organs and blood vessels — develop Raynaud's. An autoimmune disease is one in which your immune system attacks healthy tissue.

  • Rheumatoid arthritis. Raynaud's may be an initial sign of rheumatoid arthritis — an inflammatory condition causing pain and stiffness in the joints, often including the hands and feet.

  • Sjogren's syndrome. Raynaud's phenomenon can also occur in people who have Sjogren's syndrome — a rare disorder that often accompanies scleroderma, lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. The hallmark of Sjogren's syndrome, a connective tissue disease, is chronic dryness of the eyes and mouth.

  • Diseases of the arteries. Raynaud's phenomenon can be associated with various diseases that affect arteries, such as atherosclerosis — the gradual buildup of plaques in blood vessels that feed the heart (coronary arteries), or Buerger's disease — a disorder in which the blood vessels of the hands and feet become inflamed.

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway in your wrist that protects a major nerve to your hand. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition in which pressure is put on this nerve, producing numbness and pain in the affected hand. The affected hand may become more susceptible to cold temperatures and episodes of Raynaud's.

  • Repetitive trauma. Raynaud's can also be caused by repetitive trauma that damages nerves serving blood vessels in the hands and feet. In fact, nerve damage is thought to play a role in many cases of Raynaud's. Some people who type or play the piano for long periods of time or vigorously may be susceptible to Raynaud's. Workers who operate vibrating tools can develop a type of Raynaud's phenomenon called vibration-induced white finger.

  • Smoking. Smoking constricts blood vessels and is a potential cause of Raynaud's.

  • Injuries. Prior injuries to the hands or feet, such as wrist fracture, surgery, or frostbite, can lead to Raynaud's phenomenon.

  • Certain medications. Some drugs — including beta blockers, which are used to treat high blood pressure; migraine medications that contain ergotamine; estrogen replacement therapy; certain chemotherapy agents; and drugs that cause blood vessels to narrow, such as some over-the-counter cold medications — have been linked to Raynaud's.

  • Chemical exposure. Some workers in the plastics industry who are exposed to vinyl chloride develop an illness similar to scleroderma. Raynaud's can be a part of that illness.

  • Other causes. Raynaud's has also been linked to an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism), to a condition in which blood pressure rises in the blood vessels of the lungs (pulmonary hypertension) and, rarely, to certain cancers.

Raynaud's disease > 1 > 2 > 3 > 4

Ask The Doctor

Related Site:

Treatments

Treatments Programs:

 

 

Dr. Eddy's Clinic Integrated Medicine - Web Journal

Articles Articles give your more informations in detail. Forum - Forum Integrated Medicine - Ayurvedic Forum
Ayurvedic Articles give your more informations in detail. Disease Articles give your more informations in detail. Men Health Articles give your more informations in detail. Treatment Articles give your more informations in detail.
Aging Articles give your more informations in detail. Vaccination Articles give your more informations in detail. Women Health Articles give your more informations in detail. Integrated Medicine Articles give your more informations in detail.

Submit a Article Submit a Article - Articles give your more informations in detail.


 

Integrated Medicine

combines Western medicine with Complementary and Alternative medicine and mind-body-spirit approaches to health and healing.

Live Blood Analysis

Two drops of blood under a specialized high powered ultra-dark field microscope, reveals anomalies in the blood. The unique tool for prevention.

Ozone-Oxygen-Therapy
is recognized by most as the most powerful and versatile therapy known in alternative health because it plays a vital role in maintaining the well-being of the body. Check it out why.
Contact the Doctor

contact the doctor in the dreddyclinic.com

contact the doctor

Disclaimer

This information is provided for general medical education purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a physician relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient's medical condition.
In no event will The DrEddyClinic.com be liable for any decision made or action taken in reliance upon the information provided through this web site.

 

 



DrEddyClinic.com
Chiang Mai 50230, Thailand
Phone. +66-53-436284
Fax. +66-53-436284
Mobile. 098505066
email contact
contact to the Integrated - Medical -Clinic | Terms and Conditions | Back Home Up Next
Last Modified : 03/15/08 02:02 AM